America’s national parks are hit harder by climate change than the rest of the country

Driving glacial retreat, sea-level rise, and loss of forest diversity, global climate change is already affecting ecosystems across America – especially in the country’s national parks. Now, a new study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters suggests America’s national parks are being more intensely impacted by climate change than the country as a whole, becoming both warmer and drier. Led by Patrick Gonzalez, adjunct professor at the University of California, Berkeley, the stu

Climate change could spark human-wildlife conflict in some of Africa’s critical lion areas

Like other large carnivores around the world, Africa’s lions are disappearing. Lions once wandered practically the entire African continent, absent only from the Sahara Desert and the tropical forests of the Congo Basin — but today, the cats roam only about 8% of their historic range. Over the last two decades, Africa’s lion population is estimated to have decreased by 43%. The bulk of the continent’s lions now live in just six stronghold countries in eastern and southern Africa. One of the prim

Africa’s Great Green Wall: Building resilience on the frontlines of global climate change

While the region has contributed the least to global greenhouse gas emissions, Africa’s Sahel is on the front lines of climate change. A band of semi-arid savanna skirting the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, the Sahel has regularly been struck by extreme droughts over the last half century – including in 2005, 2010, and 2012 – and climate projections predict rainfall in the region will continue to be erratic. The Sahel is also warming faster than anyplace else on earth, and temperature incre

Five species threatened with climate extinction

In the midst of the planet’s sixth mass extinction, species worldwide are disappearing at an alarming rate – and climate change will only exacerbate the situation. Unlike extinctions of the past, which resulted from natural phenomena like asteroids and volcanoes, this one is triggered entirely by humans, driven by factors habitat destruction, the introduction of invasive species, and climate change. A significant portion of the earth’s imperiled species are already being impacted by rising tempe

Discovering One of the East Coast's "Last Great Places"

Every summer, countless Washingtonians speed through Dorchester County, located in the middle of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, on their way to the beach, anxious to sink their toes into Atlantic-lapped sands. But in their quest for the coast, these over-eager vacationers bypass one of the state’s most magical ecological treasures: the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. Considered one of the "Last Great Places" by the Nature Conservancy, this protected area is home to nearly a third of the state’s

Proposed route for interstate natural gas pipeline crosses Appalachian Trail and Blue Ridge Parkway

An interstate gas pipeline proposed for the Mid-Atlantic could impact two of America’s most beloved recreational thoroughfares – the Appalachian Trail and the Blue Ridge Parkway – triggering opposition from multiple citizen-advocacy groups and regional environmental organisations. The 303-mile Mountain Valley Pipeline would transport fracked natural gas from northwestern West Virginia to southern Virginia, crossing the Appalachian Trail just south-west of Peters Mountain Wilderness in Virginia,

Analysis: Who is Myron Ebell?

Amidst projections from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) identifying 2016 as the warmest year on record, America’s new president-elect, Donald Trump, has tapped one of the country’s most vociferous climate change deniers to lead the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) transition team.  While 97% of climate scientists agree on the facts of global climate change, Trump’s selection for the EPA, Myron Ebell, remains one of the country’s most outspoken opponents of climate science consen

A greener life, a greener world: Rising water and rapidly disappearing coastline: America’s first official climate refugees

Southern Louisiana is disappearing fast. In the last century, the state has lost more than 1,900 square miles of coast – an area equivalent in size to the state of Delaware. As global climate change continues to catalyze rising sea levels, and the Gulf of Mexico swallows more and more ground every year, one of the Louisiana’s most resilient communities is watching the land they have inhabited for generations slip away forever – unable to save the island they cherish from the perpetually rising water.

A greener life, a greener world: Zambia’s Lower Zambezi becomes world’s first carbon neutral national park

The Lower Zambezi National Park – one of Zambia’s premier safari destinations – now has another distinction – the world’s first carbon neutral national park. The announcement makes the Zambian park a leader in sustainable tourism not only in Africa, but around the world, and comes on the heels of the global climate agreement reached at the Paris Climate Conference (COP21) in December.